Tag Archives: interior design

Newspaper Upcycled into Wallpaper

30 Jul

“Newsworthy” is this upcycled newspaper wallcovering  – made from 100 percent recycled newsprint from Weiztner Limited:

Weiztner Newspaper Wallpaper

“Using an age-old technology of upcycling old newspapers, 100% real newsprint strips are handwoven on a loom and then paperbacked to make Newsworthy suitable for the wall. A wonderful, tactile alternative to an expected grasscloth.”

Newspaper to wallpaper

My upcycling techniques are not as industrial intensive as those practiced by Weiztner.  See my textile projects here, several examples of how I transform reclaimed materials into daily use products.

6 Recycled-Sweater Crafts

1 Jul

Several good ideas for sweater recycling from Country Living.  Pull those old sweaters out of the Goodwill bag and fire up the glue gun.

recycle sweater lampshadeMake over a plain pendant shade by cloaking it in wool. First, cut a large sweater in half along a side seam, removing the sleeves. Pull the resulting rectangle of material tightly around the shade so the fabric meets in the back; cut to fit and hot-glue to the shade. Next, trim the sweater lengthwise, leaving an inch of overhang at the top and bottom. Fold the overhang over the shade’s edges and secure on the inside with hot glue. For safety, use a low-wattage bulb.

torchierre shade from recycled sweater
For a small fixture with tons of texture, cut a knit swatch to wrap around your shade, adding an extra half inch to the top and bottom. Hot-glue the fabric to the shade so it meets in the back. Tuck the excess material over the top and bottom edges and hot-glue.
bowl covers from recycled sweaters

Keep decorative dishes in stitches: Pull a sweater sleeve over a bowl, lining up the finished cuff with the top rim, and hot-glue. Next, trim the wool so it reaches the bowl’s bottom edge and hot-glue in place.

bangle bracelets from recycled sweaters

Basic bracelets get dressed for the season in soft yarn (and, if you use jewelry you already own, they cost next to nothing). Just cover a plastic cuff in a strip of chunky knit, then hot-glue in place on the inside.

throw pillow from recycled sweatersTo make this sham, you’ll need an 18-inch square pillow insert and a large sweater, cut into two 19-inch squares. Sew the right sides of the wool together along the edges, leaving the bottom open. Turn right side out and insert the pillow form, then stitch the bottom closed. For the flower, cover a two-inch circle of card stock with a piece of a thin sweater; hot-glue to the circle’s back. Next, fold a 3- by 20-inch strip of another sweater in half lengthwise. Glue the edges together, then sew a running stitch down the strip lengthwise along the glued seam. Once you’ve stitched the entire length, pull the thread to gather the fabric and knot. Hot-glue the gathered edge in a circle to the back of the card stock, then hot-glue a pin-back in the center and affix to the pillow.
vases from recycled sweatersCreate a hothouse for any blossom: Slip a sweater sleeve over a jar or bottle, lining up the cuff with either the top or bottom edge, and hot-glue in place. Cut the wool long enough to cover the entire vessel, then secure with more glue.

Visit Country Living

World Cup affects Design

25 Jun

With all eyes on the World Cup, it is probably no accident that Pantone’s  color forecast for Fall 2010 “The Gathering” consists of African influences.

Pantone Gatherings

Pantone Gatherings Palette

“Inspired primarily by the continent of Africa with its vastness and complexities, Gatherings brings together  a    compilation of colors that demonstrate the uniqueness of the region. Artifacts and handicrafts reflect a creative boldness that is expressed in a panoply of appropriately named colors: Cypress green, Smoke Blue, Sand and Oasis mixed with the magic of Twilight Mauve, the piquancy of Lemon Curry and the heated glimmer of Copper Coin.”

Examples of palette applications.

Dining Room

Veranda

Entry

Front Entry

Summer Lovin’

31 May

Happy After Memorial Day!

Summer is in full swing.  Long winter neutrals can give way to summer fun.  Here are  some of my favorites!

Summer Living

Reposition seating to encourage conversation, replace heavy drapes with sheers to leak in sunlight.  Don’t forget to accent with fresh flowers to enjoy summer blooms day and night.

Scentsy SurfKowabunga, Dude!

Embrace the whimsical side of summer with this surf illustrated room freshener.  Throw a “clean breeze” brick in this scent warmer and chill after a day in the sun,  surf and sand.

Pastel n' green quiltA tisket a tasket, what’s summer without a picnic basket?

Perfect for a Sunday picnic, making out shapes hidden in summer  clouds or just relax in the  cool evening breeze, this twin sized hand quilted blanket is created from cool summer cotton pastels and a low loft cotton batting.

Stepping Stone

This fun, decorative stepping stone utilizes flat, smooth backsplash “riverstone”, glass marbles, and nipped marble kitchen tiles on an inch-thick sanded terracotta tile. The stone is natural and therefore has it’s own unique “imperfections,” which lends measures to it’s charm.

TurtleMs. Cutie Pie Turtle

Painted wood garden turtle to hang in your outdoor space. Recycled and reused materials.  MS CUTIE PIE is cut from reclaimed plywood and painted in glossy indoor outdoor ivy green.   An environmentally friendly creature, only the beads and paint are new.

Rag Rugs

1 Mar

Creating functional furnishings from recycled materials.


The apparel and textile industries, while creating clothes for fashion-hungry consumers, are among the largest creators of waste. For example, according to city estimates, remnant fabrics and used clothing in Los Angeles account for up to 10 percent of trash in landfills.   And even though the manufacturing base has contracted in recent years, the remaining apparel and textile producers still account for massive amounts of waste.  Despite efforts by charitable organizations such as the Red Cross, Salvation Army and Goodwill,  large amounts of clothing still ends up in landfills.


Modestly addressing this issue, I reclaim used textiles for use in rag rugs and quilts.   One company estimated that it takes as much as 8,000 liters of water to grow the cotton used for just one pair of jeans. Putting a pair of old jeans back into use as rag rugs rather than in the dump can conserve not only landfill space but also keeps already spent resources viable.

Visit my Etsy Store to see completed rugs and quilts from reclaimed materials.